Our shared path to greater

diversity, equity, and inclusion

A diverse veterinary medical team standing as a group outside of an animal hospital

Journey for Teams

Educational Modules

15-minute interactive experiences allow teams to explore, discuss and better understand DEI topics.

Take your journey one topic at a time

Journey for Teams will engage teams and individuals with focused information and inspire curiosity, reflection, and respectful dialogue. Each 15-minute module is a step in a journey that can change the way you and your team interact with your clients, patients, community and each other, for the better!

Each module consists of a video to watch with your team, a discussion guide to capture ideas and action items, and a resource of tips to help Navigators facilitate the meeting. You will also find a link to download an excerpt from the Journey for Teams Guide where you can read more and find a list of resources to deepen your knowledge on this topic.

If you would like to receive continuing education (CE) credit for Journey for Teams content, please follow this link to AVMA Axon. You will need to login to your AVMA Axon account to access the materials, which are free to AVMA members and a small fee for non-members.

Journey for Teams

Educational Modules

Module 1

The Power of Diversity

Latonia Craig, Ed.D. (she/her)

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) are core values that help shape, define and enrich a successful organization. Diversity asks the question, “who is in the room?” Equity responds with “who is trying to get in the room and can’t?” Inclusion asks, “is this environment safe for everyone who wants to be in the room to feel like they belong?” Diversity makes us stronger. Equity makes us better, and inclusion builds community.

This module takes a bird’s eye view of the Power of DEI.

Module Resources

Banaji, M.R. & Greenwals, A.G. (2013). Blindspot: hidden biases of good people. New York: Random House.

Elliott, J. (2016). A collar in my pocket: The blue eyes, brown eyes exercise. Scotts Valley: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Purdue University, College of Veterinary Medicine Diversity Certificate program https://vet.purdue.edu/diversity/certificate/

Williams, B.A. (2020). Diversity in the workplace: Eye-opening interviews to jumpstart conversations about identity, privilege, and bias. Emeryville: Callisto Media.

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

Module 2

Unconscious Bias

Naomi Nishi, Ph.D. (she/her/ella)

You have unconscious or implicit biases. We all do! We develop biases regularly to simplify our lives and daily tasks. Unconscious bias refers to the categorizations and associations our brains make to make decisions more efficiently. This otherwise helpful mechanism can become problematic when our unconscious biases affect how we make decisions about and interact with other people and their animals. One important thing to consider is how unconscious bias works in conjunction with stereotypes, such that people with historically and contemporarily marginalized identities are harmed disproportionately by unconscious bias.

Module Resources

Implicit Association Tests at Project Implicit: https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/takeatest.html

Marcelin, J.R., Siraj, D.S., Victor, R., Kotadia, S. & A., Maldonado, Y.A. (2019). The impact of unconscious bias in healthcare: How to recognize and mitigate it. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 220(2), S62–S73. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiz214

UCLA’s Implicit Bias Online Training: https://equity.ucla.edu/know/implicit-bias/

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

Module 3

Psychological Safety

Jen Brandt, Ph.D. (she/her/hers)

Psychological safety is a shared belief held by members of a team that the team is safe for interpersonal risk-taking, such as speaking up with ideas, questions, concerns, or making mistakes. Psychologically safe workplaces are important because they contribute to greater team member wellbeing, better team performance, and in healthcare settings, improved patient outcomes.

Module Resources

Books, articles, videos and blog posts about psychological safety: https://amycedmondson.com/psychological-safety/

Measuring psychological safety: https://psychsafety.co.uk/measure-psychological-safety/

Building a psychologically safe workplace, TedXHGSE talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhoLuui9gX8

Psychological safety of healthcare staff, open access article: https://psnet.ahrq.gov/perspective/annual-perspective-psychological-safety-healthcare-staff

Insights Discovery Assessment Tool: www.insights.com/us

Sense of belonging Assessment Tool from Imperial College London: https://www.imperial.ac.uk/media/imperial-college/staff/education-development-unit/public/Sense-of-belonging-at-Imperial-College-London-scale.pdf

Fear & creativity: Why psychological safety is crucial for success. Lean Learning Center. (2022, May 10).
https://leanlearningcenter.com/blog/why-psychological-safety-is-crucial-for-creative-endeavors/

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

Module 4

Microaggressions

Richard Barajas MIPA, MPH (él, he, him)

Microaggressions are everyday, verbal, nonverbal, and environmental slights, snubs, or insults that target marginalized groups. Microaggressions are both intentional and unintentional. Many, if not most, of the microaggressions an individual experiences are done unintentionally. No harm is meant by the person doing the microaggression, and yet, because of that individual’s lack of awareness, they are creating harm.

Module Resources

Greenhill, L. & Wong Lau, K. (Hosts). (2017, September 23). Microaggressions (No. 27) [Audio podcast episode]. In AAVMC’s Diversity & Inclusion on Air: Conversations about Diversity, Inclusion & Veterinary Medicine. AAVMC.
https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/27-microaggressions/id1566172448?i=1000520344997

Limbong, A. (Host). (2020, June 9). Microaggressions are a big deal: How to talk them out and when to walk away [Audio podcast episode]. In Life Kit. NPR. https://www.npr.org/2020/06/08/872371063/microaggressions-are-a-big-deal-how-to-talk-them-out-and-when-to-walk-away

Sue, D.W. (2021). Microaggressions: Death by a thousand cuts. Scientific American.

Sue, D.W. & Spanierman, L. (2020). Microaggressions in everyday life. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons.

Yang, Y., & Carroll, D.W. (2018). Gendered microaggressions in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Leadership and Research in Education, 4, 28–45.

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

Module 1

BRAVE SPACES

Mia Cary, DVM (she, hers)

A brave space is an inclusive environment in which all team members feel they belong and actively participate. Establishing a brave space allows team members to express themselves and challenge one another in positive ways. This is important for a variety of reasons, including relevance. To be relevant to current and future team members, clients, and customers, we must create inclusive, brave spaces where all team members are invited to be active participants.

Module Resources

AVMA Brace Space Certificate Program: https://axon.avma.org/local/catalog/view/product.php?productid=125

Brown, B., & Guillen, B. (Hosts). (2022, November 17). Building brave spaces [Audio podcast episode]. In Dare to Lead with Brené Brown. Brené Brown, LLC. https://brenebrown.com/podcast/building-brave-spaces/

Cary, M. (2021, August 31). How inclusive is your workplace? https://caryconsulting.com/inclusiveworkplace/

Praslova, L. N. (2022, June 2021). An intersectional approach to inclusion at work. Harvard Business Review. https://hbr.org/2022/06/an-intersectional-approach-to-inclusion-at-work

Radical Candor. (2016, August 15). Radical Candor – improve your in person, impromptu feedback [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFgu0nOHCcE

RSA. (2013, December 10). Brené Brown on empathy [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Evwgu369Jw

Twill. (2015, December 7). Why mindfulness is a superpower: an animation [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6T02g5hnT4

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

Module 6

The Art of Retention

Kemba Marshall, MPH DVM DABVP (Avian) SHRM-CP (she, hers)

Retention can indirectly measure employee satisfaction. If employers are unsuccessful at keeping the employees they have today, it is highly likely that those same issues will eventually cause newly hired employees to leave as well. The approach an organization should take to foster a diverse and inclusive workplace is contingent upon its organizational culture. The culture of an organization comprises the shared beliefs and values instilled by its leaders and reinforced through daily practices, ultimately shaping the perceptions and experiences of its employees. Implementing workplace practices that prioritize diversity and inclusion helps create an environment that builds trust and enhances employee commitment.

Module Resources

Forbes Human Resources Council. (2021, August 11). Where to look when employee turnover rates start rising. Forbes Magazine. https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbeshumanresourcescouncil/2021/08/11/where-to-look-when-employee-turnover-rates-start-climbing/?sh=423d024c19ea

Hadelman, S. (2022, February 22). Employee retention strategies to implement in 2022. Forbes Magazine. https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesagencycouncil/2022/02/22/employee-retention-strategies-to-implement-in-2022/?sh=56521f174421

Managing for employee retention. Society for Human Resources Management. (membership required)
https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/tools-and-samples/toolkits/pages/managing-for-employee-retention.aspx

McCann, M. (2022, March 23). Recruitment and retention in the third year of the pandemic require communication and compromise. Forbes Magazine. https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbeshumanresourcescouncil/2022/03/23/recruitment-and-retention-in-the-third-year-of-the-pandemic-require-communication-and-compromise/?sh=58f397357174

Reold, K. (2022, February 16). How to retain sta in 2022. Forbes Magazine.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbeshumanresourcescouncil/2022/02/16/how-to-retain-staff-in-2022/?sh=baaae94297b6

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

Module 7

THE ART OF RECRUITMENT

Tangela Williams-Hill, DVM (she, her)

Diversity recruiting intentionally seeks and recruits individuals from a broad spectrum of social identities. It is still merit-based recruitment and aims to find the best possible candidate, but it’s structured to give all applicants, regardless of background, an equal opportunity.

Module Resources

Cooks-Campbell, A. (2021, November 1). What a diversity recruiting strategy is — and how to improve it. BetterUp.
https://www.betterup.com/blog/diversity-recruiting

Dixon, J. A. (2020, September 29). 7 proactive strategies to recruit a more diverse workforce. Bamboo HR.
https://www.bamboohr.com/blog/how-to-recruit-a-diverse-workforce

Tedx Talks. (2019, June 21). How to master recruiting | Mads Faurholt-Jorgensen | TEDxWarwick [Video]. YouTube. https://youtu.be/sxjgL64czRY

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

Module 8

CLIENT COMMUNICATIONS THROUGH A DEI LENS

Susie Crockett, B.S., CVPM (she/her)

Our goal is to create a client visit experience that acknowledges and respects the needs of our diverse clientele. We should examine our communication processes from a DEI perspective at the four critical junctions of a visit — appointment scheduling, intake, clinical exam, and discharge — and make accommodations that improve patient care and the overall client experience.

Module Resources

Frey, W. (2018). The US will become ‘minority white’ in 2045, Census projects. The Avenue.
https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-avenue/2018/03/14/the-us-will-become-minority-white-in-2045-census-projects/

Funk, K. (2022, February 14). What is inclusive customer service? Accessibility. https://www.accessibility.com/blog/what-is-inclusive-customer-service

Galanti, G. A. (2000). An introduction to cultural differences. The Western Journal of Medicine, 172, 335–336. https://doi.org/10.1136/ewjm.172.5.335

Hastings, R. (2010). Cultural competence: Reconsidering the handshake.
https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/behavioral-competencies/global-and-cultural-effectiveness/pages/reconsideringthehandshake.aspx

Trovato, S. (2021, September 6). 5 ways to incorporate DEI into your CX practices. DiversityQ. https://diversityq.com/how-to-incorporate-dei-into-your-customer-experience-practices/

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

Module 9

Religious Diversity

Yvette Johnson-Walker, DVM, MS, PhD (she, her)

Religious diversity is the fact that there are significant differences in religious belief and practice. Religion plays an important role in many people’s lives. It can inform our worldview, be intertwined with culture and identity, and can influence the choices we make. Different religious traditions approach animal-human relationships in very different ways. Recognizing these differences and taking them into account when developing a plan of care will foster improved client relationships, enhance owner compliance, and improve treatment outcomes for animals.

Module Resources

Anderson, R. (March 2019). What the crow knows: A journey into the animal mind. The Atlantic. https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/03/what-the-crow-knows/580726

Bristol, W. A. (2019, January). Religion and the care, treatment, and rights of animals. Tufts University Chaplaincy. https://chaplaincy.tufts.edu/humanist/files/Religion-Animals.pdf

Davis, H., Irwin, P., Richardson, M., & O’Brien-Malone, A. (2003). When a pet dies: Religious issues, euthanasia and strategies for coping with bereavement. Anthrozoös, 16(1), 57–74. https://doi.org/10.2752/089279303786992378

Grandin, T. Improving religious slaughter practices in the U.S. Anthropology of Food, 5. https://doi.org/10.4000/aof.93

Louis Caruana, S. J. (2020). Different religions, different animal ethics? Animal Frontiers, 10(1), 8–14. https://academic.oup.com/af/article/10/1/8/5699790

Pluralism Project. (n.d.). Religions. Harvard University. https://pluralism.org/religions

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

Module 10

PATHWAY DEVELOPMENT IN VETERINARY MEDICINE

Niccole Bruno, DVM (she, her, hers)

Pathway development is the intentionality of identifying, exposing, and supporting underrepresented students (especially pursuant to race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status) to consider a profession in veterinary medicine. These programs target age ranges from kindergarten through fifth grade, middle school (12-15 years of age), high school, and undergraduate students and can range from an individual event to a continuous program. It is crucial for veterinarians to recognize and understand the diversity in cultural norms and differences of the communities they serve. However, it is equally important for them to take proactive steps to actively recruit and foster a more diverse workforce.

Module Resources

4-H. Retrieved June 5, 2023, from https://4-h.org/

EAB. (n.d.). How to build a pre-college pathway program. Purdue Diversity and Inclusion Certificate—K-12 Engagement Module. EAB. https://vet.purdue.edu/humancenteredvetmed/overview.php

Ferguson, T., and Coward-Gomes, A. (2020). C is for critter fixer. Terrence Ferguson.

Future Farmers of America. Retrieved June 5, 2023, from https://www.ffa.org/

Greenhill, L. (2019, June 1). Pipelines and pathways. Today’s Veterinary Business. https://todaysveterinarybusiness.com/pipelines-and-pathways/

Human Animal Bond Research Institute, PetcoLove. Understanding the role of race and ethnicity in pet ownership and care: survey highlights opportunity to better serve all pet parents. Human Animal Bond Research Institute. https://habri.org/DEI

League of VetaHumanz. This is how we “role.” Purdue University. https://vet.purdue.edu/vetahumanz/training/this-is-how-we-role/

Roth, C. (2021). What does a real doctor look like? Fulton Books.

Roth, C. (2022). What’s a real doctor? Fulton Books.

Thill, M. (2019, June 1). The diversity pipeline. Veterinary Advantage.
https://mydigitalpublication.com/publication/?i=789196&article_id=4559725&view=articleBrowser

Thompson, D. (2013, November 6). The 33 whitest jobs in America. The Atlantic.
https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2013/11/the-33-whitest-jobs-in-america/281180/

Vet Set Go. Retrieved June 5, 2023, from https://www.vetsetgo.com/

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

Module 11

ACCESSIBILITY IN THE WORKPLACE

Brandy Duhon, DVM (she, her)

Accessibility is the design of products, devices, services, curriculums, vehicles, or environments so that they can be used by people of all abilities.

In this module, Dr. Duhon shares her personal story as she embraces her role as a teacher, mentor, and role model for students with and without disabilities. As a child, she was diagnosed with meningitis, resulting in having both her hands and a portion of her foot amputated. Yet, with tenacity and drive, Dr. Duhon pursued her dream career in veterinary medicine.

“If we start showing younger generations and exposing them to diversity, maybe people who have disabilities won’t have such a hard time being accepted. When it comes to proving themselves or their methods, being accepted wouldn’t be such an uphill climb. Just because someone doesn’t do something the way you do it doesn’t mean it can’t be done.”

Module Resources

Americans with Disabilities Act. (n.d.). U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division. https://www.ada.gov/

Gleeson, M. (2020, May 18). Veterinary schools rethink standards for students with physical disabilities. Insight Into Diversity. https://www.insightintodiversity.com/veterinary-schools-rethink-standards-for-students-with-physical-disabilities/

DiGioia, P. (2012, October 1). Veterinarians with disabilities: Practicing a full life. VIN News Service.
https://news.vin.com/default.aspx?pid=210&catId=638&id=5545971

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

Module 12

CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS IN VETERINARY MEDICINE

Latonia Craig, Ed.D. (she, her)

Understanding culture is essential for understanding cultural responsiveness because culture influences and shapes the way people perceive, interpret, and respond to the world around them. Culture encompasses a wide range of aspects, including shared values, beliefs, and customs that can define a particular group, community, or individual. Regardless of a person’s background, everyone possesses a unique cultural identity, which is influenced by various factors such as family, education, religion, language, and experiences.

Module Resources

Krause, I.-B. (1993). Book review: Promoting cultural diversity: Strategies for health care professionals Kathryn Hopkins Kavanagh & Patricia H. Kennedy sage publications, 1992. pp. 162, Pb. £13.50; ISBN 0-8039-4657-0. International Journal of Social Psychiatry, 39(4), 313–313. https://doi.org/10.1177/002076409303900407

MeetingNotes.com. (n.d.). 10 rapport-building questions to build trust and connection quickly. https://meetingnotes.com/blog/rapport-building-questions

Minnican, C., & O’Toole, G. (2020). Exploring the incidence of culturally responsive communication in Australian healthcare: The first rapid review on this concept. BMC Health Services Research, 20(1), 20. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4859-6

Plotts, C. (2020). Cultural intentions. DBC Publishing.

Twin English Centres. (n.d.). Learn to say hello in 50 languages. https://www.twinenglishcentres.com/blog/learn-to-say-hello-in-50-languages

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

Ewan Wolff

EMBRACING GENDER DIVERSITY: EXPLORING GENDER IDENTITY

Ewan Wolff, PhD, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM) (they/them/theirs)

Gender diversity is a multifaceted concept that encompasses a wide range of expressions. It is crucial to acknowledge that gender is fluid, allowing for diverse identities and expressions. Much like a vibrant spectrum of colors can convey emotions, feelings, and experiences, embracing and appreciating the complete spectrum of gender diversity enables us to value and respect the distinctiveness of every person.

Module Resources

American Psychological Association. (2023). Understanding transgender people, gender identity and gender expressionhttps://www.apa.org/topics/lgbtq/transgender-people-gender-identity-gender-expression

Barker, M.-J., & Scheele, J. (2019). Gender: A graphic guide. Icon Books.

Fiarman, S. E. (2016). Unconscious bias: When good intentions aren’t enough. Educational Leadership, 74(3), 10–15.

Huffman, A. H., Mills, M. J., Howes, S. S., & Albritton, M. D. (2021). Workplace support and a rming behaviors: Moving toward a transgender, gender diverse, and non-binary friendly workplace. International Journal of Transgender Health, 22(3), 225–242.

PFLAG. (2020, December). Gender expression. PFLAG National Glossary of Terms. https://pflag.org/glossary/

PrideVMC. (2023). Gender diversity guide. https://pridevmc.org/gender-diversity-guide/

PrideVMC. (2021). Gender Identity Bill of Rights. https://pridevmc.org/gibor/

Trevor Project. (2021). Trevor Project research brief: Diversity of non-binary youth. https://www.thetrevorproject.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Diversity-of-Nonbinary-Youth_-July-Research-Brief.pdf

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

ALLYSHIP

Lisa M. Greenhill, MPA, Ed.D. (she/her/hers)

It’s likely that you have heard the term ally or allyship countless times during your career. You may even consider yourself an ally to some individuals in your personal and professional lives. While this commitment is a good first step, there is an opportunity to peel back the layers to understand more deeply what it means to be an ally and engage in allyship.

Module Resources

The Anti-Oppression Network. (2018, March 12). Retrieved May 8, 2023, from https://theantioppressionnetwork.com/allyship/

Catlin, K. (2019). Better allies: Everyday actions to create inclusive, engaging workplaces. Better Allies Press.

Greenhill, L., & Craig, L. (2019). Diversity and inclusion on air: From bystander to ally [Video]. YouTube. Retrieved May 8, 2023, from https://www.youtube.com/live/PoAUqgguRk0?feature=share

Hughes, C. The 7 types of allies – which one are you? Retrieved October 12, 2023, from https://inclusiveleadersgroup.com/the-7-types-of-allies-which-one-are-you/

Lamont, A. (n.d.). The guide to allyship. Retrieved May 8, 2023, from https://guidetoallyship.com/

Salter, N. P., & Migliaccio, L. (2019). Allyship as a diversity and inclusion tool in the workplace. In Diversity within diversity management (pp. 131–152). Emerald Publishing Limited.

Wong, A. (2020). Disability visibility. Crown Books for Young Readers.

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

Michelle Rodems

UNDERSTANDING GENERATIONAL DIVERSITY

Michelle Rodems, Ph.D. (she/her/hers)

Examples of generational diversity “gone wrong” populate every kind of media currently available today, from newspapers and prime-time evening news to memes and TikTok. Challenges related to generational diversity, while a popular topic of workplace training today, even date back to the time of Socrates, who, in his own words, criticized “O youth.” Mainstream analysis and humor may be our most obvious reference to generational diversity, but the workplace is where most of us have our most pervasive experiences with generational diversity.

Module Resources

Hennelly, D.S., & Schurman, B. (2023, January 5). Bridging generational divides in your workplace. Harvard Business Review Ascend. Retrieved May 20, 2023, from https://hbr.org/2023/01/bridging-generational-divides-in-your-workplace.

Janssen, D., & Carradini, S. (2021). Generation Z workplace communication habits and expectations. IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication, 64(2), 137–153.

Kalita, S.M. (2024, January 24). What to know when five generations share an o ce. Charter-in partnership with Time Newsletter. Retrieved June 1, 2023, from https://time.com/charter/6249581/what-to-know-when-five-generations-share-an-o ce/

Lee, C.C., Lim, H.S., Seo, D., & Kwak, D-H. (2022). Examining employee retention and motivation: the moderating e ect of employee generation. Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, 10(4), 385–402.

Organizational Learning & Talent Development. (2022, May 4.) The five generations at work [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nuT8ysUhSgA

Organizational Learning & Talent Development. (2022, May 11.) Leading and engaging the five generations at work [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5fe8sLsnwfo

Strauss, W. & Howe, N. (1992). Generations: The history of America’s future, 1584 to 2069. Quill.

The inclusion of resources by this author does not imply or constitute an endorsement by the American Veterinary Medical Association or the Veterinary Medical Association Executives.

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